The theaters below show films in their original language; click on the links for showtimes and ticket information.
Interviews with the stars, general film articles, and reports on press conferences and film festivals.
Subscribe to the free KinoCritics monthly email newsletter here.

Burning Down the House: the story of CBGB
by Nancy Tilitz

Mandy Stein’s captivating  feature  documentary  covers  the  rise  and  fall  of  the  infamous  music  club  CBGB  and  the  founder,  country  guitarist  Hilly  Kristal.  It  opened  December  1973  in  the  heart  of  New  York  City’s  Bowery  on  the  lower  east  side,  which,  at  that  time,  was  a  seamy  neighborhood  of  flophouses,  drug  addicts  and  prostitutes.  The  front-door  awning  carried  the  initials  CBGB  with  a  smaller  OMFUG  underneath.  This  stood  for  Country  Blue  Grass  Blues  and  Other  Music  for  Uplifting  Gormandizers  (ravenous  eaters  of  music).

Kristal  soon  changed  the  music  program  to  include  local  rock  acts  as  they  were  more  plentiful  than  country  blues  groups.  Eventually  acts  like  the  Ramones,  Talking  Heads  (whose  song  “Burning  Down  the  House”  gave  the  film  its  title),  Patti  Smith  and  others  worked  out  their  material  onstage  to  small  audiences  at  CBGB.  This  work  would  later  be  known  as  punk  and  new  wave.  Sadly,  Hilly  Kristal’s  health  began  to  fade.  An  epic  battle  ensued  with  his  landlord,  the  non-profit  Home  Residence  Organization,  whose  owner  Muzzi  Rosenblatt  wanted  the  club  out  no  matter  the  cost.

Serious  moves  were  made  to  relocate  the  club  to  Las  Vegas,  an  appropriate  place  for  the  free-for-all  the  performances  had  become.  Although  the  club  made  no  money,  expenses  would  be  “covered”  with  the  CBGB  clothing  franchise.  However,  Kristal  became  very  sick,  could  not  complete  the  deal,  and  lost  a  court  appeal  for  hundreds  of  thousands  of  dollars  in  back  rent.   
Famed  guitarist  Steve  van  Zandt  (Tony  Soprano’s  second  in  command,  Silvio  Dante  in  a  bandanna?)  seemed  to  idolize  Hilly,  as  did  other  famous  musicians  and  media  artists  interviewed,  but  they  seemed  helpless  to  save  the  club.  The  2006  footage  shows  a  great  closing  party;  one  year  later  Hilly  died  of  lung  cancer.

Background  information:  Director  Mandy  Stein’s  mother,  Linda  Stein,  was  the  manager  of  the  Ramones  and  appears  in  the  archival  film  footage.  Later  she  became  New  York\'s  real  estate  broker  to  the  stars  dealing  with  celebrity  elite  such  as  Elton  John  and  Angelina  Jolie.  In  2007  Linda  Stein  was  gruesomely  murdered  by  her  former  personal  assistant,  who  initially  admitted  to  the  crime  saying  Stein,  “just  kept  yelling  at  her.”  She  later  rescinded  her  plea  in  court.  The  assistant’s  family  tried  to  implicate  Mandy  Stein  in  the  killing  since  Mandy  and  her  sister  had  discovered  their  mother’s  body  in  her  apartment  on  78th  St  and  Fifth  Avenue.  This  film  is  dedicated  “to  Linda.”